We believe that this newly discovered jug is the earliest dated piece of Dutch tin-glazed earthenware. It was made in Utrecht in 1558 by a potter from Antwerp.

It marks the moment when this renaissance technology arrived in a gothic world and was the first stage in the development of the great tradition of Dutch Delftware.

Potters from Italy brought their skills to Antwerp in the early 16th century from whence it spread to France, Holland, Spain and eventually England.

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Frederik van Frytom (c. 1632-1702) is considered to be the most accomplished artist to have painted on Delftware.

The luminous tone and fine detail of his brush work combine to make his plaques amongst the most beautiful achievements of Dutch Delft.

A scene such as this is probably after one of van Frytom's own drawings of views in the neighbourhood of Delft and an original work of art.

He is one of the few artists in Delft to have been permitted to work independently outside the rigid guild system.

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One of the largest dishes of the Christie Miller service, the most richly decorated of all Meissen services, remaining in private hands.
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A Meissen part service painted with views of Dresden and Royal palaces in its neighbourhood.
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Chinese 'Imari' porcelain elaborately mounted in silver gilt probably in Vienna.
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A group of early Chelsea porcelains from a private collection.